What To Write In Your CV If You Don’t Have Any Experience

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Jennifer Sanders

Jennifer Sanders

Jennifer Sanders is a writer and an editor from London. She loves sport, to listen to music, and to communicate with different people. Find Jennifer on Twitter and Facebook.

Once you finish school and are ready to join the adult world, the excitement can be overwhelming. The world is filled with recent graduates and young job seekers such as yourself, which makes the competition huge and often, unfair. To get the job you were trained to do and aspire to work at, you need job experience. But, how do you get job experience if you can’t land a job without one?

Luckily, employers don’t just look for job experience. This is a praised qualification, but there are plenty of other things they look for in a job candidate. Of course, this makes the importance of your job application that much higher, which is why you need to learn how to write a great CV without the required job experience.


Here are some expert tips on how to do this:


1.   Start with a Great Personal Statement

The personal statement is the very first thing employers see when they look at your CV, which means that it is the first thing you should focus on. Without job experience, your best and only shot at getting the job is by impressing the hiring manager. A great personal statement is a sure start in this endeavor.
Firstly, begin with a short and simple personal statement that introduces your top skills and your education level. The details should come after. Think of this as an introduction – a piece of content where you point out to the key information in an enticing and short manner.
Is there anything about your skills or education that is impressive and relevant to the job position? If there is something, this is the place to use it.


2.   Tailor a CV to a Job

When you don’t have job experience in the field, you shouldn’t even think of sending out the same CV to more than one hiring manager. Your CV must impress, which is why a unique and focused approach is essential.
Tailor each CV you send out to the specific job you are applying to get. It is always better to send out high-quality applications to fewer jobs than poorly designed applications to more.
To do this, scan the posting and pull out the requirements of the employer. Then, narrow down your experiences and qualifications to the ones that fit these requirements. Feel free to use other qualifications that aren’t closely related to the job to fill in the blanks, but don’t go overboard. The most relevant information comes first.


3.   Improve Your CV Writing Skills

If you just started your search for a job, you probably don’t know how a great CV should look like. Since you probably want to land a job as soon as possible, you might want to consider getting some guidance or help instead of just improvising in your application. You can improve your skills by reading some great CV-s or even get some expert help from professional resume services.


4.   Identify the Transferable Skills

Do you know what transferable skills are? These are the skills you already possess as a result of another job or experience you’ve had in the past. If you can use these skills in the desired job, they are your transferable skills.
Transferable skills are the key tool for landing a job for candidates with no experience or little experience. Identify what these skills are and add them to your CV. Even though the odds are more in the favor of those with work experience, a percentage of 65% of employers value relevant or transferable skills over experience.


5.   Use Keywords

Most recruiters don’t have the time to read all applications, especially if they get hundreds of them for a single job position. With this in mind, your best shot at getting the hiring manager to read your CV is to use keywords. Since they’ll probably be scanning CVs instead of reading them in detail, you should use keywords that will attract their attention.
Use the job posting to determine what the keywords are. Search for experience and skills required, and use their demands as keywords in your CV.


6.   Add Some Personality

A CV should be a formal application and a place where you need to be serious, but this doesn’t mean that you can’t show your enthusiasm for the job position. If you add a bit of personality into your CV, you can get a better position than other candidates who simply brag with their experiences.
Make your CV unique and attract the reader with it. Employers look for more than just job experience and education. They often seek the right personality that will fit into their team’s culture.


7.   Use Your Degree

Not having actual at-the-office experience does not mean that you don’t have any experience at all. Play it up a little. Use your degree as a source of transferable skills you can show off. If you submitted a great dissertation, tell them about your research skills. If you worked on projects with others, speak of your teamwork skills. You can mention volunteering and projects as a related and transferable experience that’s relevant to the job position offered.

Having no job experience does not make you a bad candidate for a job position. In fact, you can be the best candidate there is for a specific job, but you still have to prove the recruiter that you are it. To do that, use the tricks above when writing your application. If you do, you can impress recruiters with your application and convince them that job experience isn’t the only reason why they should choose an employee.


Featured image: Pexels

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Jennifer Sanders

Jennifer Sanders

Jennifer Sanders is a writer and an editor from London. She loves sport, to listen to music, and to communicate with different people. Find Jennifer on Twitter and Facebook.

What To Write In Your CV …

by Jennifer Sanders time to read: 4 min
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