Nietzsche, The Birth of Tragedy, and Capitalism7 min read

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Stephen Mallet

Stephen Mallet

Intelligent scepticism is never an overrated characteristic within modernity. I'm a Politics and International Relations student at Royal Holloway and a freelance writer. I take an interest in a variety of topics, mostly concerning political philosophy and contemporary political affairs. An advocate of critical thinking who prizes analysing the normal and justifying the non-existent.

‘God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers? What was holiest and mightiest of all that the world has yet owned has bled to death under our knives: who will wipe this blood off us? What water is there for us to clean ourselves? What festivals of atonement, what sacred games shall we have to invent? Is not the greatness of this deed too great for us? Must we ourselves not become gods simply to appear worthy of it?’ This is perhaps the most famous quote from the God killing philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche; the revolutionary of the heavens and critic of Christian morality and ethics. Nietzsche certainly became a controversial figure from the start of his intellectual life and continued to be influential beyond his own mortal life. Retrospectively, his work has been remembered for its decisiveness and forceful attempts to deconstruct what he saw to be a very problematic set of ideas; however, like many notable figures, Nietzsche’s reputation as a critic has somewhat led to an oversight of some of his subtle and more consoling philosophical works.

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Stephen Mallet

Stephen Mallet

Intelligent scepticism is never an overrated characteristic within modernity. I'm a Politics and International Relations student at Royal Holloway and a freelance writer. I take an interest in a variety of topics, mostly concerning political philosophy and contemporary political affairs. An advocate of critical thinking who prizes analysing the normal and justifying the non-existent.

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